I’m excited to have experienced a ton of professional learning in November. I’m still processing. But in the same month, life hasn’t come without some unexpected speed bumps, potholes, and detours to remind me of just how human the ride can be.

I’m sad that George Herbert Walker Bush has died. It’s like the end of an era–the last iconic figure of The Greatest Generation. A decorated war hero, Ambassador to the UN, Envoy to China, Director of the CIA, Congressman, Senator, Chairman of the RNC, Vice President, President… and the list goes on. But while there was never another person in history more qualified to be President, none of those major accomplishments or titles were why he was so endearing to the public.

It was his character. His integrity. How he treated people. How he put his family, friends, and country before himself. That is what people of all political parties and backgrounds are talking about. Think about that…

That’s a legacy that matters.

Also going home at ninety-four years young was my wife’s grandma (which also means my grandma). It wasn’t the small town of Mediapolis, Iowa, or even how so many friends and family members gathered together over Thanksgiving–which she would have loved, by the way. It was the realization by ones who married into the family of just how special she was–and is–in the memory of loved ones. My wife and her grandma were close.

Speaking at her funeral, one grandson said something special:

“While all of us who have talked so far said some of the same things, it’s interesting how each one of us also had a slightly different nuance. That is how special Grandma was.”

She cared about each person. She was beloved by her family, friends, and community.

That’s a legacy that matters.

Finally, I leave you with this from my friend, Chris Tuttell. Chris has a way of focusing on big things that matter, and also reminding others of big things that matter, too. There’s really not too much more to say that can properly set the stage.

I don’t cry easily, but I have to warn you about this one.

And I have to ask you:

Are you leaving a legacy that matters?