#HamstraHighlights

Leadership · Curriculum · STEM

#HamstraHighlights

Check It At The Door?

I love blogging. It truly helps me deeply process those experiences that mean so much to me. This reflecting helps me think through things, research what I don’t know, check my blind spots, and even revisit the archive to see where I may have been… wrong, misguided, or simply inexperienced in career and life.

#HamstraHighlights is committed to maintaining a learning portfolio–not a showcase portfolio. My journey isn’t perfect. In fact, it’s a total mess. And I rarely revise or edit past posts. They’re there so that I have several reference points from which to measure my learning and growth over time.

Over time, I’ve grown to recognize some simple truths: I am wholly imperfect. I am wholly human. I wrestle. I laugh. I cry. I learn. I grow. Sometimes it really hurts. There are misunderstandings. I’m constantly zooming out. But sometimes it’s a moment so precious that I’m literally begging God for a pause button. These people, these times, this right here right now–I love this! Please don’t ever let it end!

But then, of course, it does. Time is cruel like that.

In my third blog ever, Check It At The Door, posted on December 17th, 2016, I was super passionate about educators checking all their negativity at the door in order to maximize a positive learning climate for our elementary learners. I remember exactly the context in which I was writing and the reasons thereof. Indeed, I’m still there, and I’m not apologizing for that post. It will remain in the archives. But I am wrestling.

I’m not saying that I’m changing my stance, opinion, or viewpoint. I am saying that life doesn’t seem quite as binary or extreme as it once did. Maybe age and experience have something to do with this. And I’d definitely credit my friends who continually challenge me to learn, grow, and #becomebetter. I’m so grateful for them. If you’re surrounding yourself with only like-minded people all the time, then the echo chamber will eventually become your enemy. It will stifle your potential to be the best version of yourself. It will limit your life.

Recently, Brene Brown‘s Dare to Lead is really pushing my thinking. Can you really check any part of yourself at any door? Can we really, fully,  separate our heart, vulnerability, and other emotions from the rest of our selves in any setting at any time? In addition, would it be beneficial to share at least part of our heart–part of whom we are–as the whole person and the whole educator to practice courage in uncomfortable situations? Let’s rumble…

What are your thoughts? Comment here!

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