Think THIS is special? Think THAT experience was mind-blowing? OHJust Wait

Well into our mid-thirties, my wife and I just had our first baby. Like most first-time parents, we’re not only overjoyed, we’re right certain that our newborn baby is… well…  perfect.

As a veteran classroom teacher, I’ve been working with parents for years. Throughout this time, many of our colleagues and friends have taken personal time to build their families while my wife and I would cover the bases for our team and school. Now, it’s our turn.

When you’re a late bloomer, to some scale so to speak, you find yourself surrounded by others (many several years younger) who’ve been there done that.

So now that we’re celebrating our own Myalstones, all we hear from everyone around us is: Just Wait. Just wait till this happens or that happens. It’s very rare that we have conversations with anyone until we hear this cliche. If you think this is special or that was unique, Just Wait

Just Wait until…

  • He’s two-years-old, and he tests your patience;
  • He’s four-years-old, and he doesn’t care what you think;
  • You have your second, third, or fourth kid;
  • You play zone defense instead of man-to-man;
  • You have to pay for all the expenses;
  • You have to pay with all of your time;
  • You have to taxi and cheer at all his activities;
  • You have no time to tweet, blog, or write a book;
  • And on… and on… and on… What would you add?

When I hear Just Wait, I always nod and smile.

I’m grateful for the advice, guidance, and mentoring from those in our lives farther along certain journeys. And let me say that again–I have access to so many brilliant minds right at my fingertips. I am SO thankful they’re in my life–They have literally changed my life. These educator superstars agree with me, disagree with me, challenge me, nudge me, and even silence me at times. And I’m forever grateful, seeking their wisdom in all the stages of life.

Throughout my career, I’ve also been telling myself to Just Wait. I’ve been anxious about what’s next. Will I become an administrator? How about a big-time blogger, consultant, or author? Moment-By-Moment, I’m constantly asking myself:

  • What problems can I solve?
  • How can I make a difference?
  • How can I add value to learning communities?
  • How can I make learning experiences better for students and teachers?
  • How can I continue doing something meaningful, while having a larger impact?
  • How can I continue doing something that matters, while having greater influence?
  • How could I #becomebetter, so I can be more and contribute more to my family, my communities, and society?

While there’s a danger in living in the past, except to build on learning from mistakes, it’s also unhealthy to worry too much about the future. There’s a difference between setting long-term career goals and perpetually Just Wait-ing for the next stage. There’s a difference between pining over what’s next and appreciating the present moment.

While I’ll continue inviting Just Wait guidance from mentors and those more experienced than me with open arms, I’m equally resolving to live in the present. As a lifelong learner on a lifelong learning journey, I want to fully enjoy each stage of life and career as it happens. I want to be in the moment, appreciating what’s happening right now.

One thing I love about New Year’s Eve is that while analyzing the past and resolving to be better in the future, celebrants are forced to focus on the present moment–albeit while counting down…